Chili Pepper Madness

September 20, 2013

Pasilla Chili Peppers

250 - 3,999 Scovilles: Pasilla or “little raisin” properly refers to the dried chilaca pepper. The chilaca, when fresh, is also known as pasilla bajio, or as the chile negro or “Mexican negro” because, while it starts off dark green, it ends up dark brown. It typically grows from 8 to 10 inches long. The pasilla pepper should not be confused with the ancho. The ancho is the dried version of the poblano pepper that growers and grocers frequently mislabel as the pasilla in the United States. The darker anchos ARE also sometimes known as chile negro - thus generating much confusion - but they are not the same as the pasilla peppers. Featuring a rich smoky taste, the pasilla often turns up in dried whole form or as a powder in Mexican salsas as well as in mole and adobo sauces. The pasilla can even create an interesting twist…
September 22, 2013

Fresno Chili Peppers

2,500-10,000 Scovilles. Capsicum Annuum. The Fresno pepper looks and tastes almost like a jalapeno, but they can be much hotter. Fresno peppers change from green to red as they grow, and increase in hotness, but they are often harvested and sold as green. The green peppers are mild to medium hot, while the mature red version is much hotter, surpassing the jalapeno. They grow to about 2-3 inches in length and have a diameter of about one inch. Fresno chiles are commonly grown in the U.S. and are popular for making ceviche and salsa. The green peppers can be used in many types of dishes to add great flavor, but the hotter red version may be better for dips or salsas. Fresno peppers do not dry well, so they are not ground down to powder, like many other types of chiles.
Published in Medium Chili Peppers
September 22, 2013

Aji Chili Peppers

1,177 - 75,000 Scovilles. Also known generally as the Peruvian hot pepper, aji is the common name primarily in South America and areas of the Caribbean for chili peppers. A few popular aji are: The aji amarillo, or “aji yellow” or “yellow chile,” also known as the aji escabeche, the most common pepper cultivated and consumed in Peru. It often grows from 3 to 5 inches long easily, though it sometimes reaches 6 to 7 inches, and its color changes to a deep orange when mature. It is usually hot, from 40,000 to 50,000 on the Scoville scale, with a pungent flavor. It often appears in dried and powdered forms, and finds its way into many traditional Peruvian dishes as well as some Bolivian dishes. The Lemon Drop, or Hot Lemon, also known in Peru as Kellu Uchu. It comes from a vine-like bush that grows about 3 feet, and…
September 20, 2013

Hatch Chili Peppers

1,000 - 2,500 Scovilles. Hatch chili peppers are grown and harvested in Hatch Valley, New Mexico. Located in the heart of the Rio Grande agricultural territory, Hatch, New Mexico, is often referred to as the Chili Capital of the World. Hatch chili peppers refer to the type of chilies has brought to fame, regardless of where they were actually grown. Hatch chilies are a cultivar of the common New Mexico green chili developed at the Chile Institute at New Mexico State University in the 1920s. The Hatch Chile Festival occurs annually each Labor Day weekend and draws up to 30,000 people from around the world to the tiny town of less than 2,000 residents.
September 20, 2013

Poblano Chili Peppers

1,000 - 2,000 Scovilles. The poblano is an extremely popular chili pepper. 4 inches long, very dark green in color, ripening to dark red or brown. How do you pronounce poblano? puh-BLAH-noe. Poblano peppers are mild peppers, quite large and are somewhat heart-shaped. Their skins/walls are very thick, making them perfect for stuffing as they'll hold up in the oven quite nicely. They are typically roasted and peeled when cooking with them, or dried. When dried, they are called ancho chilis. Poblanos originated in Puebla, Mexico, and one of the most popular peppers grown there. The poblano plant is multi-stemmed and can reach up to 25 inches high. The pods are 3-6 inches long and 2-3 inches wide. Immature poblano peppers are deep purple-green in color, and eventually turn dark red and black as they age. They are closely related to the mulato chili. Common Uses of Poblano Peppers In…
September 22, 2013

Cascabel Chili Peppers

1,000-3,000 Scovilles. Capsicum Annuum. The Cascabel Chile is grown in several areas of Mexico. It is small and round, 2-3 cm in diameter, and matures to a deep red. It is also called Chile Bola, meaning ball chile in Spanish. When dried, it turns to a dark brownish red, and the seeds become loose and rattle inside the chile. This is the reason for the name Cascabel, which means "little bell" or "sleigh bell" in Spanish. With a mild to moderate heat level, the Cascabel is perfect for adding a touch of heat to soups, salsas, stews and sauces.
September 22, 2013

Morita Chili Peppers

2,500 - 8,000 Scovilles (or up to 10,000). Morita chilies are smoked, red-ripe jalapeno peppers, much like the chipotle pepper. The main difference is that Moritas are smoked for less time, which leaves them softer and retains their slightly fruity flavor. They are very richly flavored.
Published in Medium Chili Peppers
2,500-3,000 Scovilles. This giant chili pepper was introduced by New Mexico State University in the 1970s as a cross between a few different types of local chiles and a Peruvian chile. They measure 10-12” and mature to red, but are usually harvested and used when green. The peppers have actually been listed in the Guinness Book of World Records for being the largest chile ever grown. The New Mex Big Jim has a mildly spicy flavor and is great for chiles rellenos because of its size. They could also be used in salsa or on salads, or the red ones could be dried to make beautiful ristras. They’re also great for roasting, pickling or just about anything else you can think of.
September 22, 2013

Mirasol Chili Peppers

2,500-5,000 Scovilles. The name Mirasol means "looking at the sun" in Spanish, which describes the way these peppers grow on the plant. They are known asGuajillo in their dried form, which are one of the main chiles used in traditional mole sauces. The Mirasol varies in size and appearance, but it is conical in shape, and commonly 4-5 inches long, and about 2 inches wide. It is red to dark red, or copper in color. The flavor of the Mirasol is fruity and berry-like, and is described as full-bodied, distinct, and "delicate." It is perfect for chicken, fish, potato, or pork dishes and adds a delicious spiciness to salsas, stews, chilis and mole sauces. They are very common in Peruvian cooking.
September 22, 2013

Rocotillo Chili Peppers

1,500-2,500 Scovilles. There is some confusion about the rocotillo chili pepper, since some appear to be from Capsicum baccatum and some from Capsicum Chinense. They look and taste similar but have different origins. In addition, the name “rocotillo” is used locally to describe different peppers in different parts of the world. The chili discussed on this page is one of the more common types referred to as “rocotillo.” Originally from Peru, the Rocotillo is grown in Cuba, Puerto Rico and the southern United States. This round, pudgy little chili pepper starts out green or yellow and ends up a variety of colors, including red, orange or brown. They can be harvested and used in any of these stages. They can also be dried easily. Rocotillos have a fruity flavor with mild heat. They are delicious in Spanish or Mexican dishes such as soups, stews or salsa, and they make a…
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Mike Hultquist of Chili Pepper Madness

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Hi, Everyone! It is nice to meet you. Welcome to Chili Pepper Madness, the food blog run by Mike and Patty Hultquist, a couple of spicy food lovers. Chili Pepper Madness is a special tribute to all things chili peppers, including chili pepper recipes... LEARN MORE ABOUT US

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Jalapeno Poppers and other Stuffed Chili Peppers Cookbook