Chili Pepper Madness

100,000-200,000 Scovilles. As the name suggests, these peppers are from Jamaica, but have become popular around the world. There are a few varieties of Jamaican hot peppers: The Jamaican Hot Chocolate Pepper matures to a rich brown color with ribbed and wrinkled skin. They grow to about 2 inches and have a very spicy Caribbean flavor. They are great for use in hot sauces and marinades. The Jamaican Hot Red or Yellow Pepper is squash-shaped with thinner skin and matures to a bright yellow or red. The red is slightly spicier than the other two varieties. These can be pickled or even eaten fresh, if you can get past the intense heat. Great for use in sauces, salsas and marinades.
Published in Hot Chili Peppers
September 22, 2013

Aji Chili Peppers

1,177 - 75,000 Scovilles. Also known generally as the Peruvian hot pepper, aji is the common name primarily in South America and areas of the Caribbean for chili peppers. A few popular aji are: The aji amarillo, or “aji yellow” or “yellow chile,” also known as the aji escabeche, the most common pepper cultivated and consumed in Peru. It often grows from 3 to 5 inches long easily, though it sometimes reaches 6 to 7 inches, and its color changes to a deep orange when mature. It is usually hot, from 40,000 to 50,000 on the Scoville scale, with a pungent flavor. It often appears in dried and powdered forms, and finds its way into many traditional Peruvian dishes as well as some Bolivian dishes. The Lemon Drop, or Hot Lemon, also known in Peru as Kellu Uchu. It comes from a vine-like bush that grows about 3 feet, and…
1,000,000 + Scoville Heat Units! Yep, these babies are officially the hottest peppers around, toping the Red Savina Habanero. It was awarded the distinction of World's Hottest of All Spices by the Guinness World Records in 2006. Bhut Jolokia Pepper Uses Use the Bhut Jolokia as you'd use a habanero, but remember that they are much hotter, up to 5 times the heat level. Use caution when cooking with them. Wear gloves and protect your eyes. Bhut Jolokia belongs to the Capsicum chinense family, like the Habanero, Scotch Bonnet and Red Savina. They originate in Northern India. It is also known as Naga Jolokia, Ghost Pepper or Ghost Chili. Note: "Naga" mean "Cobra Snake" in Sanskrit. History of the Bhut Jolokia The bhut jolokia pepper has been in the running for the hottest pepper in the world for some time now - in fact, it actually held the Guinness Book…
Published in Superhot Chili Peppers
175,000 Scovilles. Also sometimes known as Piri Piri or Pili Pili, the African Bird’s Eye is a small chile, growing to only about 1 inch, but they pack a lot of punch. They mature to red or purple, and have a tapered shape, with a blunt point. Historically found in the African wild, it has recently been grown commercially in some parts of Africa, often to be used as pepper extract or as organic pest control. The African Bird’s Eye is commonly used in soups, stews, hot sauces and chicken dishes, but the flavor is less interesting than other popular peppers. It is a close relative of the Tabasco pepper. It is the main ingredient in Peri Peri Sauce - get the recipe here.  
Published in Hot Chili Peppers
October 07, 2013

Habanero Chili Pepper

100,000 - 350,000 Scovilles originally. 80,000 - 600,000 Scovilles is the new range. This pepper is named after the Cuban city of La Habana, known here as Havana, because it used to feature in heavy trading there. It is related to the Scotch bonnet pepper; they have somewhat different pod types but are varieties of the same species and have similar heat levels. The habanero pepper grows mainly on the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, where it is now thought to have originated, though it also grows in other hot climates including in Belize, in Costa Rica, in parts of the United States, and in Panama where it is known as the aji chombo. Once the Spanish had discovered it, they spread it far and wide around the world, so much so that taxonomists in the 18th century thought it originated in China and therefore named it “Capsicum chinense” or the…
Published in Hot Chili Peppers
September 20, 2013

Poblano Chili Peppers

1,000 - 2,000 Scovilles. The poblano is an extremely popular chili pepper. 4 inches long, very dark green in color, ripening to dark red or brown. How do you pronounce poblano? puh-BLAH-noe. Poblano peppers are mild peppers, quite large and are somewhat heart-shaped. Their skins/walls are very thick, making them perfect for stuffing as they'll hold up in the oven quite nicely. They are typically roasted and peeled when cooking with them, or dried. When dried, they are called ancho chilis. Poblanos originated in Puebla, Mexico, and one of the most popular peppers grown there. The poblano plant is multi-stemmed and can reach up to 25 inches high. The pods are 3-6 inches long and 2-3 inches wide. Immature poblano peppers are deep purple-green in color, and eventually turn dark red and black as they age. They are closely related to the mulato chili. Common Uses of Poblano Peppers In…
125,000-325,000 Scovilles. The Devil’s Tongue is similar in color and shape to the Fatalii, but with smoother skin and smaller size. It matures to a bright yellow or yellow-orange and has a sweet, fruity flavor, if you can get past the intense heat. It appears to be in the habanero family, but it was “discovered” in Pennsylvania growing amongst other habaneros, so its exact origins are unknown. The heat level rivals that of the habanero and is still much hotter than most peppers.
Published in Hot Chili Peppers
300,000 - 475,000 Scovilles. This extremely hot pepper, originally from the Yucatn peninsula in Mexico, is now also cultivated in the Carribean and around North America. This pepper typically grows to about 1 inch in diameter and 1 1/2 inches in length. It appears plentifully from bushes growing around 3 feet in height. The Carribean red habanero is about twice as hot as a regular habanero. It matures in as little as 90 days, and is suited to northern climates and even to growing in a larger-sized container. This pepper is considered especially nice for decorative purposes as well, though you will want to harvest it eventually for the fruity flavor as a fine addition to extra spicy salsas and marinades and for some very hot sauces.
Published in Superhot Chili Peppers
A hot sauce recipe made with the tropical flavors of pineapple and mango, and the fiery heat of the fatalii chili pepper. A great combination of heat and sweet. Homemade hot sauces are great because you can customize them to you very specific tastes are needs. The Fatalii pepper is an ideal hot sauce ingredient, as it brings in a good pop of heat that has quite a bit of a bite to it. While not as hot as a habanero pepper (though pretty darned close), the Fatalii has a bit of a sting when you first bring it into your mouth. While I like the heat, I also love the sweet, so I paired a few Fatalii peppers with some fresh pineapple and fresh mango to compliment this great pepper. What you get is a tropical vibe that is big on flavor, a nice combination of both "heat" and…
Published in Hot Sauces
300,000-425,000 Scovilles. The Chocolate Habanero, also known as “Congo Black” or “Black Habanero,” is one of the hottest peppers originating from the Caribbean. It ripens to a beautiful chocolate brown and delivers searing heat. They take longer to grow and mature than other habanero varieties, but they are well worth the wait. Fruits grow to about 3 inches long by 2 inches wide. The Chocolate Habanero has a distinctively rich and unique flavor. Cooks love using it to spice up a meal, with a little going a long way. It is great for use in salsas, sauces, and especially Jamaican Jerk Sauce. They can be dried easily and reconstituted with water for use in sauces or cooking.
Published in Superhot Chili Peppers
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Mike Hultquist of Chili Pepper Madness

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Hi, Everyone! It is nice to meet you. Welcome to Chili Pepper Madness, the food blog run by Mike and Patty Hultquist, a couple of spicy food lovers. Chili Pepper Madness is a special tribute to all things chili peppers, including chili pepper recipes... LEARN MORE ABOUT US

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Jalapeno Poppers and other Stuffed Chili Peppers Cookbook