Chili Pepper Madness

September 23, 2013

Serrano Peppers

5,000 - 23,000 Scovilles. The serrano chili pepper is a smaller version of the jalapeno pepper, similar in color, but smaller, about 1 to 4 inches long on average and 1/2 inch wide. They generally grow between 1 - 4 inches long and about 1/2 inch wide though they have been known to grow longer. They are meaty peppers and are not the best choice for drying. The serrano pepper originated in the Mexican states of Puebla and Hidalgo. They are commonly red, brown, orange, or yellow, though you are likely to find them in their more common green color, much like a jalapeno pepper.
10,000-30,000 Scovilles. Grown for centuries in Bolivia (Central South America), the Bolivian Rainbow chile is a stunningly beautiful plant. The peppers start out a brilliant purple and turn yellow to orange to red, with all stages of the pepper present on the plant at once, making it a bright and colorful addition to your garden or your home. They can be grown indoors and will produce fruits continuously, year-round. When grown outside, they need a warm climate. The peppers are small, about 1 inch, and cone-shaped, growing upright on the plant. They somewhat resemble Christmas lights because of their shape and their bright and differing colors. In addition, the foliage and blossoms are purple, making the plant even more unique.
September 22, 2013

Aji Chili Peppers

1,177 - 75,000 Scovilles. Also known generally as the Peruvian hot pepper, aji is the common name primarily in South America and areas of the Caribbean for chili peppers. 
September 23, 2013

Aji Amarillo Chili Peppers

30,000-50,000 Scovilles. Since “Amarillo” is the Spanish word for yellow, and “Ají” is the term for chile in South America, this pepper is also appropriately known as the “yellow chile.” The Ají Amarillo is grown in all areas of Peru. Used by the Incas, it is still the most common and popular chile in that country. It may be said that is it possibly the most important ingredient in Peruvian cooking. It grows to about 4-5 inches in length, and despite its name, it actually matures to a deep orange. Like other chiles from this area, the Amarillo has a fruity, berry-like flavor. It is medium in heat level, but it does not leave your mouth burning. It is also great as a condiment. The Ají Amarillo may be sold in Latin food stores and on the internet in its dried or paste form.
5,000-30,000 Scovilles. Capsicum Baccatum. This chile is a member of the Capsicum Baccatum species, which includes the Ají pepper. It has an interesting shape, hence its name, and can be very spicy, with a fruity flavor. It is red when mature, and measures about 1 inch long and 2-3 inches wide. It can be used fresh in salsas or salads, and can be dried or pickled as well.
September 23, 2013

Aleppo Chili Peppers

About 10,000 Scovilles. Capsicum Annuum. The Aleppo pepper, also known as the Halaby pepper, is named after the city of Aleppo in Northern Syria. It is commonly grown in Syria and Turkey, and is usually dried and crushed. Aleppo pepper is used in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern cuisine, although it has become very popular around the world as an alternative to crushed red pepper or paprika, due to its beautiful deep red color, rich fruity undertones and aromatic flavor. It is perfect for chili, pizza, sauces, or anywhere you may normally use paprika, if you like the extra heat. However, it is not as hot as conventional crushed red pepper, because it is de-seeded before it is crushed.
Published in Medium Chili Peppers
20,000-30,000 Scovilles. The Jwala is the most popular chile in India, adding great flavor and spice to many Indian dishes. The word “Jwala” means “Volcano” in Hindi, and they are commonly found in the Gujarat region of India. The peppers start out light green and ripen to red, and can be used fresh or dried. They grow to about 4 inches in length with wrinkled skin, and resemble a slightly curved finger. The plants are very productive, and can be grown easily in pots or in a garden.
Sources rate this chile in 2 categories- 15,000-30,000 and 50,000-65,000 Scovilles. Capsicum Annuum. Chiles de Árbol are small and thin Mexican peppers, growing to 2-3 inches long and less than a ½ inch wide. They mature to red, and are harvested and used at this stage. Chile de Árbol means “tree chili” in Spanish, a name which refers to the woody stem of the pepper. Other names for this chile include Bird’s beak chile, andRat’s tail chile. These peppers may be sold fresh, dried or powdered. The dried whole chilis are often used to make chile wreaths, or ristras, because when dried they keep their deep red color.
September 23, 2013

Peter Pepper Chili Peppers

5,000-30,000 Scovilles. This very interesting little chili makes a great conversation piece in the garden or in the kitchen due to its distinctively phallic shape, hence its name. It grows to about 3-4 inches long and 1-1.5 inches wide, and matures to a bright red. Originally from Texas and Louisiana, they are grown commercially and seeds can be obtained through private companies. They are great for salsas!
September 23, 2013

Lemon Drop Chili Pepper

15,000-30,000 Scovilles. This bright yellow, citrus-flavored chile is also known as Kellu Uchu in Peru, where it originated. The pods grow to 2-3 inches long and ½ inch wide with wrinkled skin. Its unique lemon taste has caught the attention of those who love the citrus flavor of habanero but just can’t quite handle the intense heat. The Lemon Drop is a fantastic substitute. Although the heat is intense, it does not linger. Instead, it leaves behind the nice, lemony flavor.
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Mike Hultquist of Chili Pepper Madness

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Hi, Everyone! It is nice to meet you. Welcome to Chili Pepper Madness, the food blog run by Mike and Patty Hultquist, a couple of spicy food lovers. Chili Pepper Madness is a special tribute to all things chili peppers, including chili pepper recipes... LEARN MORE ABOUT US



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