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7 August 2019

Pickled mustard seeds is a wonder condiment, delivering tiny bursts of vinegary-sweet flavor in each bite. Learn how to make it at home with this recipe.

Have you ever tried pickled mustard seeds? They’re such a unique flavor and texture addition to many different meals. You’d be forgiven to think that pickled mustard seeds taste the same as homemade mustard, which is made from the exact same ingredients.

Pickled mustard seeds are much different from mustard in so many ways. 

Let’s discuss this interesting condiment.

Pickled Mustard Seeds in a bowl, ready to serve

What Are Pickled Mustard Seeds?

Pickled mustard seeds are dry mustard seeds that have been soaked in a flavored vinegar solution until they absorb and swell with that infused flavor. The seeds are popularly used as a condiment, sandwich topping, salad dressing accompaniment, and can be frequently found on charcuterie boards.

Let’s talk about how we make them, shall we?

Pickled Mustard Seeds ingredients

How to Pickl Mustard Seeds – the Recipe Method

First, rinse 1/2 cup of yellow mustard seeds with water through a sieve or through a cheese cloth.

Next, add the rinsed seeds, 3/4 cup of apple cider vinegar, and 1/2 teaspoon salt to a small bowl. Soak the seeds for two hours at room temperature.

Soaking mustard seeds in vinegar

Next, add the soaked mustard seeds to a small saucepan. Stir in 2 tablespoons of honey or sugar (optional for a touch of sweetness), 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of red pepper flakes if you’d like a bit of heat, and 1/2 teaspoon black pepper. Skip the flakes if you’d like a milder condiment.

Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes.

Allow to cool. Stir in an extra ¼ cup of vinegar and transfer to a jar or container and seal. Keep in the refrigerator.

Boom! You’ve got yourself some pickled mustard seeds. They look wonderful, don’t they? Tiny little burst of flavor that will add a bit of zing to any dish.

Pickled Mustard Seeds in a bowl

Tips for Making Pickled Mustard Seeds

  • Recipe Variations. You can add other ingredients to play with the flavors. Some ideas include chopped onion, garlic (though it won’t last as long), other seasonings like turmeric, crushed peppercorns, spicy chili powders, dried herbs and more.
  • Other Liquids. Try replacing some of the vinegar with another flavorful liquid, like beer, wine or juice. This will change the final flavor of the condiment, which could be fun and interesting.
  • Mustard Seeds. I’ve made this with yellow mustard seeds, as they are the most popular for serving, but you can make pickled mustard seeds with brown or black mustard seeds. Those seeds are more bitter, so plan accordingly.
  • Vinegar. I’ve used apple cider vinegar for the sweetness and tang, but feel free to substitute other vinegars, such as white wine vinegar or champagne vinegar.
  • Bitterness. Mustard seeds have an inherent bitterness to them. If you feel the resulting condiment is too bitter, try soaking the seeds for longer, or use more honey or sugar. You can also bring the seeds to a quick boil in water then rinse them off a few times to remove the bitter tannins before continuing with the vinegar.

Pickled Mustard Seeds in a bowl with a serving spoon

How Long Do Pickled Mustard Seeds Last?

Pickled mustard seeds will last several months refrigerated. If the seeds dry out or become too thick, as they will continue to absorb the liquid, simply swirl in a bit more vinegar to keep them moist.

10 Ways to Use Pickled Mustard Seeds

  1. Swirl them into a spinach salad with a zingy vinaigrette.
  2. Stir them into dressings for a flavor and texture boost.
  3. Spoon them onto deviled eggs for an appetizer upgrade.
  4. Stir them into egg salad for a new take on egg salad sandwiches.
  5. Scoop them onto a sandwich instead of mustard.
  6. Use them as a topping for grilled sausages or hot dogs, or over grilled pork chops or chicken breast.
  7. Scoop them over fatty meats, like corned beef, steaks, roasts or pulled pork.
  8. Serve them with your next charcuterie board.
  9. Swirl them into your favorite dips.
  10. Spoon some into your next potato salad.

Close up of these wonderful pickled mustard seeds

Mustard Recipes

If you enjoy mustard, try making some at home. Here are some links to the different homemade mustards I enjoy making.

See the list of mustard recipes in our Homemade Condiments Recipes.

Here are some links to purchase mustard seeds from Amazon. These are affiliate links, my friends. I buy them in bulk for making mustard whenever I want. Great stuff!

Got any questions? Ask away! I’m happy to help. If you enjoy this recipe, I hope you’ll leave a comment with some STARS. Also, please share it on social media. Don’t forget to tag us at #ChiliPepperMadness. I’ll be sure to share! Thanks! — Mike H.

Pickled Mustard Seeds with a spoonful of plump, flavor seeds

5 from 2 votes
Pickled Mustard Seeds Recipe - How to Make Pickled Mustard Seeds
Pickled Mustard Seeds Recipe - How to Make Pickled Mustard Seeds
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Soaking Time
2 hrs
Total Time
30 mins
 
Pickled mustard seeds is a wonder condiment, delivering tiny bursts of vinegary-sweet flavor in each bite. Learn how to make it at home with this recipe.
Course: Main Course, Seasonings
Cuisine: American
Keyword: coleslaw recipe, condiment, mustard, mustard seeds, spicy
Servings: 24
Calories: 24 kcal
Author: Mike Hultquist
Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup yellow mustard seeds
  • 3/4 cup apple cider vinegar plus ¼ cup + more as needed
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons honey or sugar or more for more sweet and less bitter
  • ½ - 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes optional
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
Instructions
  1. Rinse the mustard seeds with water through a sieve or through a cheese cloth.
  2. Add the rinsed seeds, 3/4 cup of the apple cider vinegar, and salt to a small bowl and soak for two hours at room temperature.
  3. Add the soaked mustard seeds to a small pot. Stir in the honey or sugar, red pepper flakes and black pepper. Bring to a quick boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes.
  4. Allow to cool. Stir in the remaining ¼ cup vinegar and transfer to a sealable jar or container. Keep in the refrigerator.
Recipe Notes

Pickled mustard seeds will last several months refrigerated. If the seeds dry out or become too thick, as they will continue to absorb the liquid, simply swirl in a bit more vinegar to keep them moist.

Nutrition Facts
Pickled Mustard Seeds Recipe - How to Make Pickled Mustard Seeds
Amount Per Serving
Calories 24 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Sodium 49mg2%
Potassium 31mg1%
Carbohydrates 2g1%
Sugar 1g1%
Vitamin C 0.2mg0%
Calcium 10mg1%
Iron 0.3mg2%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Pickled Mustard Seeds: How to Make Them - Pickled mustard seeds is a wonder condiment, delivering tiny bursts of vinegary-sweet flavor in each bite. Learn how to make it at home with this recipe. #Condiment #Mustard

6 comments

  1. Rebecca J Hoffman

    After you soak the mustard seeds for two hours, do you discard the soaking liquid or add it to the pot?

    I haven’t had a chance to make this yet, but it sounds wonderful!

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Rebecca, leave it in. The liquid will actually absorb into the seeds. Let me know how it turns out for you.

  2. 5 stars
    Mike: These are good on a sandwich. Yes, they are a bit bitter, and next time I will try your remedy for that. I used yellow seeds, 3/4 t of red pepper flakes, which was not enough, and 2 T of mesquite honey. It wasn’t sweet. It smelled rather like honey mustard sauce while it was simmering, but then the bitterness came out at the end.

    Thanks for the recipe. I’d never heard or even thought of pickled mustard seeds before. I like the deviled egg idea.
    Kathy

      1. 5 stars
        They have one problem-they are flat-out addicting. You will never want to be without them.

        Kathy

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