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22 September 2013

The mirasol pepper is a Mexican chile pepper popular in making traditional mole sauces. The name means “looking at the sun”. In dried form, they are known as guajillo peppers. Learn more about these peppers below.

Scoville Heat Units: 2,500-5,000 SHU
Capsicum Annuum

The mirasol pepper is a popular chili pepper in the Mexican culture widely known for making traditional Mexican mole sauces. The name translates to “looking at the sun” in Spanish, taken from how the peppers grow upright on the plant, literally “looking” at the sun as they grow on the plant. You may know mirasol peppers by their dried variety, the guajillo pepper, which is much more common and hugely popular in Mexican cuisine.

What Do Mirasol Peppers Look Like?

The Mirasol varies in size and appearance, but it is conical in shape, and commonly 4-5 inches long, and about 2 inches wide. It is red to dark red, or copper in color. It is a fairly thin skinned pepper, ideal for drying into popular guajillo peppers.

What Do Mirasol Peppers Taste Like?

The flavor of the Mirasol offers up a unique spicy flavor, though not too spicy. It is fruity and berry-like, and is described as full-bodied, distinct, and “delicate.”

How Hot are Mirasol Peppers?

Mirasol peppers range in heat from 2,500 to 5,000 Scoville Heat Units on the Scoville Scale, which is considered a milder to mild-medium heat range. Compare that to the common jalapeno pepper, which averages about 5,000 SHU, and you’ll find the hottest mirasol chile is about as hot as an average jalapeno pepper.

Cooking with Mirasol Peppers

These peppers are perfect for chicken, fish, potato, or pork dishes and add a delicious spiciness to salsas, stews, chilis and particulary mole sauces, for which they are known for. They are very common in Peruvian cooking, and also Mexican cooking.

Got any questions? Ask away! I’m glad to help.

2 comments

  1. So a guajillo pepper is a dried mirasol pepper? Plenty of shops are selling pepper seeds for both mirasol and guajillo. They are wrong? Just curious.

    Great website by the way!

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Thanks, Eugene. Yes, the guajillo is the dried version of the mirasol pepper.

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