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12 October 2018

A simple, spicy, easy-to-make recipe for ghost pepper jelly with sugar, pectin, and lots of fresh ghost peppers. Perfect as a spread but also as a starter glaze or sauce.

More ghost pepper recipes, my friends! I can’t help myself. I grew so many ghost peppers, I have to figure out what to do with them!

Do you ever have that problem?

Seriously, though, I grew a lot on purpose because I LOVE using ghost peppers in several different recipes, from making homemade ghost pepper powder to fresh ghost pepper salsa to picante style ghost pepper salsa, ghost pepper wings and so much more.

I’m crazy for ghost peppers!

Ghost Peppers

Don’t they look great?

Aside from all those other recipes, I’m also making a staple ingredient I like to keep in my refrigerator – We’re talking ghost pepper jelly.

YES!

This jelly is nice and sweet and works as a simple spread for crackers or breads or toasts. It’s a flavorful snack. It also works for me as a super quick glaze for grilled meats, like chicken or fish.

Seriously, sear up a salmon or swordfish fillet or some seasoned chicken and finish them off with a tablespoon of this.

You will love it!

You can also use your own homemade ghost pepper jelly as the start of a glaze for those very same meals. So much of the work is already done!

Beware, though. Unlike my Jalapeno Jelly Recipe, which is nice and sweet with a touch of spice, this recipe packs some heat! Ghost peppers are no joke. Even though you are straining out the ghost peppers, the resulting jelly is quite hot.

In a good way, though, my spicy food loving friends.

Let’s talk about how we make this ghost pepper jelly, shall we?

How to Make Ghost Pepper Jelly – The Recipe Method

How to Make Ghost Pepper Jelly

First, chop your ghost peppers. Start with a half pound of them.

Add them to a large pot.

Next, add 4 cups of sugar. Yes, this is a sweet jelly recipe.

Pour in 1-1/4 cups vinegar, 1/4 cup lime juice, and a teaspoon of salt.

Stir it all together.

Bring the mixture to a quick boil and simmer it for about 10 minutes to let the flavors develop.

After 10 minutes, pour the contents into a different pot, then strain it back into the original pot. Make sure all of the solids are removed.

Pour in 3 ounces of liquid fruit pectin.

Bring the liquid back to a boil, stirring a bit, and boil for 1 minute.

Pour or ladle the hot liquid into 4 clean 8-ounce jars, like so.

Pouring the Jalapeno Jelly

Screw on the caps and refrigerate overnight. The jalapeno jelly will set over night, though it could potentially take up to 2 weeks to fully gel.

I keep mine in the refrigerator and eat them within a month or 2, but if you’d like to keep them for longer and/or want to store them at room temperature, you can process them in a water bath. See information on that below.

Recipe Notes and FAQ

Here are answers to some questions I get on making jellies and jams.

Sealing Jellies and Jams – The Water Bath Method

Properly sealing jellies and jams is important for longer keeping. To do this, use jars that have been cleaned with soap and water, then held in hot water until you’re ready for jarring.

Or, you can sterilize the jars by boiling them in hot water for 10 minutes. Add 1 minute of boiling time for every 1000 feet of altitude. Set them into hot water while you prepare your jelly or jam.

Wash and rinse the bands and lids.

Next, prepare the boiling water canner or pot with enough clean water to cover the jars by at least an inch or 2. Bring the water to 180 degrees F. Just under a boil.

Pour the hot jelly or jam into the sterilized jars, leaving 1/4 inch of head space. Wipe the jar rims and screw on the cleaned rings bands and lids. Place them onto the canning rack, ensuring the jars are 1-2 inches below the water.

Bring the water to a boil and boil for 5 minutes, or 10 minutes if you’re not using sterilized jars. Add an extra minute per 1000 feet elevation over 1000 feet.

Remove the jars and set them onto a protected surface.

Mike holding his newly made ghost pepper jelly

Benefits of the Water Bath

Water bath processing super heats the air at the top of the jar, effectively killing any spores or yeast from the air, as you don’t want to seal those in with lower sugar jams.

The method also makes for a stronger seal than simply letting the jelly or jam cool and pop.

Storing Jellies and Jams

Don’t move the jellies or jams for at least 12 hours after you’ve made them, or you risk breaking the gel. After proper cooling, check the seals and store in a cool, dry place.

Your jellies and jams should last a year this way, but the flavor is still best if used within a few months.

Recommended Products

Here is a link to the jam/jelly jars that I personally use and prefer. Highly recommended. Affiliate link – FYI: Ball Mason 8oz Quilted Jelly Jars with Lids and Bands, Set of 12

Try Some of My Other Popular Jelly and Jam Recipes

Try Some of My Other Popular Ghost Pepper Recipes

Ghost Pepper Jelly, Ready to Eat!

If you enjoy this recipe, I hope you’ll leave a comment with some STARS. Also, please share it on social media. Don’t forget to tag us at #ChiliPepperMadness. I’ll be sure to share! Thanks! — Mike H.

4.25 from 4 votes
Ghost Pepper Jelly Recipe
Ghost Pepper Jelly - Recipe
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
15 mins
Total Time
25 mins
 
A simple, spicy, easy-to-make recipe for ghost pepper jelly with sugar, pectin, and lots of fresh ghost peppers. Perfect as a spread but also as a starter glaze or sauce.
Course: Appetizer
Cuisine: American
Keyword: ghost pepper, jelly, spicy
Servings: 40
Calories: 80 kcal
Ingredients
  • 1/2 pound ghost peppers chopped (about 20-30 ghost peppers)
  • 4 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 ounces liquid fruit pectin
  • 4 drops red food coloring if preferred - NOTE: I didn't use any for this recipe.
Instructions
  1. Finely chop the ghost peppers and add them to a large pan.
  2. Add sugar, vinegar, lime juice, and salt.
  3. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to low and simmer for about 10 minutes.
  4. Strain out the ghost peppers and return the mixture to the pan.
  5. Return heat to high and bring liquid to a boil. Stir in pectin and boil for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat.
  6. If using food coloring, add it now and stir.
  7. Ladle the hot liquid into clean jars and screw on the lids.
  8. Cool overnight in the refrigerator. The mixture will solidify into jelly.

Recipe Video

Recipe Notes

Makes 4 8-ounce jars.

Heat Factor: HOT. Ghost peppers have a great amount of heat, even though you're straining them out. Keep the ghost peppers in the mix for a ghost pepper jam.

Nutrition Facts
Ghost Pepper Jelly - Recipe
Amount Per Serving
Calories 80
% Daily Value*
Sodium 58mg 2%
Potassium 17mg 0%
Total Carbohydrates 20g 7%
Sugars 20g
Vitamin A 0.4%
Vitamin C 6.1%
Calcium 0.1%
Iron 0.2%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

 

Ghost Pepper Jelly - A simple, spicy, easy-to-make recipe for ghost pepper jelly with sugar, pectin, and lots of fresh ghost peppers. Perfect as a spread but also as a starter glaze or sauce. #Jelly #GhostPepperJelly #GhostPeppers #BhutJolokia #HotPepperJelly #Spicy

12 comments

  1. Avinash Gune

    How can use pectin powder, because that is what I have available. Can you please tell me, How much and when to add it? Thanks in advance

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      You should be able to use pectin powder, no problem, but check the instructions on the packet.

  2. This time of year (November) I’ve got a lot of green peppers (Habaneros) that will never ripen. So I repeated this recipe with green habaneros and got the same result but that was greenish instead of orange-ish. Waste not; want not!

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Perfect use, Jim! I’ll bet the flavor is awesome. I love it. Thanks for sharing.

  3. MIKE WALDMAN

    I made this recipe using a blend of all four peppers I grow.
    Reapers, Nagas, SB’s, & WirWiri peppers. Rough chopped them and simmered. I did strain because I wanted the jelly to be clean so to speak. The jelly came out perfectly and it’s QUITE HOT! 🔥
    But it’s great and will be used or given as gifts. A note to add the recipe made 4 perfectly filled jars which was kinda cool I thought. Oh and the stuff I “strained” went into the dehydrator overnight and made some very interesting “ candy”!!

  4. Jeffrey Palmer - From Wisconsin

    You reallu know to to tear my heart out:) There was a place that sold ghost pepper plants last year…
    No more…I love the taste of them..habs and jalas and ajis too
    But miss the lingering burn of the GP

    Oh my kindom for a some GH!

  5. I’ve got a plethora of Habañeros instead of Ghosts. Do you think the same quantities would work?
    Also, how much extra heat will I get if I don’t strain out the bits?

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Jim, absolutely. You’ll definitely get more heat if you don’t strain. How much? Hard to say, but hotter for sure.

      1. OK, I went the Habañero route: 9 oz. stemmed and seeded Habañeros pulsed to a fine grind in the Cuisinart. Strained the solids and added one whole pouch of Certo pectin (vs. 3 oz). Got 4+ pints. Did the 10 minute water bath to avoid constant refrigeration.
        This is one hot jelly. I’m not sure how to use it except as part of a glaze or sauce. Sure not going to put it on my biscuits!

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