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27 January 2020

Learn how to make tabasco hot sauce with this homemade tabasco sauce recipe, using garden grown tabasco peppers, vinegar and salt. Fermented and non-fermented versions.

If you’ve ever considered making your own Tabasco hot sauce at home, I have the perfect recipe for you right here. I’ve been making my own hot sauces for years, and I grew tabasco peppers in my garden this year just so I could make this sauce.

I’m a big fan of Tabasco Sauce. Some people in the chilihead community bash Tabasco Sauce because of its vinegary flavor and its low level of heat compared to other hot sauces on the market, but I personally have a huge amount of respect for the Tabasco brand and McIlhenny Company, as they’ve been around since 1868 on Avery Island, Louisiana, founded by Edmund Mcilhenny.

They practically started the hot sauce industry by bringing it to the masses. Any company with such longevity and unquestioning popularity deserves respect in my book. Besides, I personally enjoy vinegary hot sauces, so here we are, making some at home.

Join me, will you? I’ll show you how to make it two different ways – fermented and non-fermented versions.

Holding a bottle of Homemade Tabasco Sauce

Let’s discuss how we make homemade tabasco hot sauce at home, shall we?

Tabasco Sauce Ingredients

  • FOR FERMENTED TABASCO SAUCE
  • 5 ounces tabasco peppers, roughly chopped
  • 3 tablespoons sea salt + 1/4 teaspoon salt, divided
  • 1 quart unchlorinated water
  • 1 cup white wine vinegar
  • FOR NON-FERMENTED TABASCO SAUCE
  • 5 ounces tabasco peppers
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup white wine vinegar

Homemade Tabasco Sauce Recipe

How to Make Tabasco Sauce – the Recipe Method

FOR THE FERMENTED VERSION

First, ferment the tabasco peppers. You can process them to coarsely chop them or rough chop them with a knife. Pack them into a jar, leaving at least 1 inch of head space. The peppers may rise a bit when fermenting.

Next, mix 1 quart unchlorinated water with 3 tablespoons sea salt. Pour just enough brine over the peppers to cover them, pressing them down a bit as you go. It is important to keep the peppers covered with brine to avoid spoilage. Check this daily.

Screw on the lid and set the jar away from direct sunlight to ferment for at least 1 week. Ideal temperatures are between 55-75 degrees F. The most active fermentation period is between 1-2 weeks, so be sure to monitor it during this time. “Burp” the jars often by unscrewing the lid a bit to let out some of the accumulating gases. Or, use an airlock or membrane for easier fermenting. See our page, “How to Make Fermented Pepper Mash”, for further instruction.

After 1-2 weeks, the fermenting activity will diminish and the brine will turn cloudy and taste acidic.

Fermenting red serrano peppers in a jar with brine

Pour the fermented tabasco peppers, including brine, into a pot along with vinegar. Alternatively, you can strain and toss the brine, then add the solids to a pot with vinegar and 1/2 cup water or more as desired. More brine = more salty. Bring to a quick boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.

Cool slightly then add to a food processor. Process until smooth.

Strain the mixture to remove the solids. Pour into hot sauce bottles and enjoy. You can adjust the volume with additional water and/or vinegar.

FOR THE NON-FERMENTED VERSION

Add the tabasco peppers, vinegar and ¼ teaspoon salt to a small pot.

Bring the mixture to a quick boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 15 minutes to soften.

Cooking down tabasco peppers to make hot sauce

Cool slightly, then add to a food processor. Process until smooth. Gorgeous red pepper sauce right there already, much like the Tabasco original red sauce, but brighter in color.

Processing the tabasco peppers in a food procesor

Strain the pepper seeds and pulp mixture to remove the solids. Look at how much of the seeds and pulp remains. You don’t need to seed the peppers first, as we’re straining the hot sauce.

Straining the seeds and pitch from the Tabasco Hot Sauce

Pour into hot sauce bottles and enjoy. You can adjust the volume with additional water and/or vinegar.

NOTE: Each version makes about 1 cup unstrained and ½ cup strained. I added in more vinegar to fill up 2 woozy bottles and get the consistency more like original Tabasco hot sauce.

Boom! That’s it, my friends. Now you have your very own homemade tabasco sauce, ready to drizzle and splash over all of your favorite foods. Add a bit of spice to your lives! I hope you enjoy it.

Recipe Tips & Notes

Making hot sauce in general is easy, but there are a number of factors that can affect the overall quality and flavor of your finished hot sauce. If you want to make tabasco hot sauce at home, consider some of these factors.

2 bottles of Homemade Tabasco Sauce

Fermented vs. Non-Fermented Tabasco Sauce

McHilleny Company ferments tabasco peppers for their original Tabasco Sauce brand in white oak barrels for up to 3 years. The longer you ferment, the more the flavor develops. You’ll have a difficult time duplicating the exact flavor of Tabasco without time, oak barrels, and trade secrets. However, it is still worth making a fermented version at home.

The fermented version is quite a bit mellower than the non-fermented version. Fermenting breaks down the peppers chemically. Essentially, lactic acid bacteria breaks down the carbohydrates in peppers and converts them to acid. It is a bit like a controlled decay process, and there are numerous benefits to fermentation, including more digestible foods, more vitamins, and more desirable flavors.

The non-fermented version, however, is much easier to make and tastes wonderful as well. Comparatively, it has a stronger flavor with a bit more bite. Plus, you don’t have to wait a week or more for fermenting. You can have it ready in less than half an hour.

Don’t ask me to choose which version I enjoy more. I love them both!

Learn How to Ferment Chili Peppers here. 

The Vinegar

Your choice of vinegar will make a big difference in your resulting flavor. The key is choosing a good quality vinegar, and especially one of which you enjoy the flavor. Using a cheap white vinegar will give you a cheaper tasting hot sauce.

Can I Make Tabasco Sauce without Tabasco Peppers?

You can make this recipe with any type of chili pepper you like. The original Tabasco Hot sauce, however, uses tabasco peppers, so using other peppers won’t give you the same flavor. If you use other peppers, you’re technically making a Louisiana Style Hot Sauce, which is a larger category of hot sauces.

But go for it! I make hot sauces with different peppers, and also mix and match them, all the time with great results.  Learn more about tabasco peppers (capsicum frutescens) here.

Customizing Your Homemade Tabasco Sauce

Consider this a base recipe. It tastes great with only 3 ingredients – peppers, vinegar and salt. After that, you can customize it to your own preferences with other ingredients. Consider adding other flavors like garlic or onion, fruits like pineapple, mango or papaya, as well as herbs and seasonings such as cilantro, basil, chili powder or cumin.

You can also introduce other peppers for more flavor and heat, like the smoky chipotle pepper or fiery ghost pepper.

Comparing a bottle of store bought Tabasco Sauce with my Homemade Tabasco Sauce

How Hot is Tabasco Sauce?

Even though tabasco peppers are very hot, actual Tabasco Hot Sauce is not quite as hot as the actual peppers, measuring in at 2,500–5,000 Scoville Heat Units. That is about as hot as a mild to medium-heat jalapeno pepper.

That’s it, my friends. I hope you enjoy the sauce. If you make it, shoot me a pic or post it on social. I’d love to take a look!

Try Some of My Other Hot Sauce Recipes

Check out more Hot Sauce Recipes or learn more about How to Make Hot Sauce with lots of answer to frequently asked questions, such as pH and acidity, processing, and where to buy hot sauce woozy bottles. Grab a couple bottles of tabasco sauce!

Mike holding 2 bottles of Homemade Tabasco Sauce

Got any questions? Ask away! I’m happy to help. If you enjoy this recipe, I hope you’ll leave a comment with some STARS. Also, please share it on social media. Don’t forget to tag us at #ChiliPepperMadness. I’ll be sure to share! Thanks! — Mike H.

Homemade Tabasco Sauce Recipe
Print Recipe
4.92 from 24 votes

Homemade Tabasco Sauce Recipe

Learn how to make tabasco hot sauce with this homemade tabasco sauce recipe, using garden grown tabasco peppers, vinegar and salt. Fermented and non-fermented versions.
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time15 mins
FOR FERMENTING7 d
Course: hot sauce, Main Course
Cuisine: American
Keyword: fermented, hot sauce, recipe, spicy, tabasco
Servings: 60 teaspoons
Calories: 2kcal

Ingredients

FOR THE FERMENTED VERSION

  • 5 ounces tabasco peppers roughly chopped
  • 3 tablespoons sea salt + 1/4 teaspoon salt divided
  • 1 quart unchlorinated water
  • 1 cup white wine vinegar or more as desired

FOR THE NON-FERMENTED VERSION

  • 5 ounces tabasco peppers
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup white wine vinegar or more as desired

Instructions

FOR THE FERMENTED VERSION

  • First, ferment the tabasco peppers. You can process them to coarsely chop them or rough chop them with a knife. Pack them into a jar, leaving at least 1 inch of head space. The peppers may rise a bit when fermenting.
  • Next, mix 1 quart unchlorinated water with 3 tablespoons sea salt. Pour just enough brine over the peppers to cover them, pressing them down a bit as you go. Itis important to keep the peppers covered with brine to avoid spoilage. Check this daily.
  • Screw on the lid and set the jar away from direct sunlight to ferment for at least 1 week. Ideal temperatures are between 55-75 degrees F. The most active fermentation period is between 1-2 weeks, so be sure to monitor it during this time. “Burp” the jars often by unscrewing the lid a bit to let out some of the accumulating gases. Or, use an airlock or membrane for easier fermenting. See our page, “How to Make Fermented Pepper Mash”, for further instruction.
  • After 1-2 weeks, the fermenting activity will diminish and the brine will turn cloudy and taste acidic.
  • Pour the fermented tabasco peppers, including brine, into a pot along with vinegar. Alternatively, you can strain and toss the brine, then add the solids to a pot with vinegar and 1/2 cup water or more as desired. More brine = more salty. Bring to a quick boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
  • Cool slightly then add to a food processor. Process until smooth.
  • Strain the mixture to remove the solids. Pour into hot sauce bottles and enjoy. You can adjust the volume with additional water and/or vinegar.

FOR THE NON-FERMENTED VERSION

  • Add the tabasco peppers, vinegar and ¼ teaspoon salt to a small pot.
  • Bring the mixture to a quick boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 15 minutes to soften.
  • Cool slightly, then add to a food processor. Process until smooth.
  • Strain the mixture to remove the solids. Pour into hot sauce bottles and enjoy. You can adjust the volume with additional water and/or vinegar.

Notes

NOTE: Each version makes about 1 cup unstrained and ½ cup strained. I added in more vinegar to fill up 2 woozy bottles and get the consistency more like original Tabasco hot sauce.
Heat Factor: Medium. You'll get a good level of heat from tabasco peppers, though not overwhelming. If you'd like a hotter version, bring in some other hotter peppers, like the ghost pepper.

Nutrition

Calories: 2kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 10mg | Potassium: 9mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 22IU | Vitamin C: 3mg | Calcium: 1mg | Iron: 1mg
Homemade Tabasco Sauce

91 comments

  1. 5 stars
    Thanks for the detailed explanation. I am curious to know if there is a specific reason to simmer the fermented peppers with vinegar instead of with the salted brine? Is it for the taste or you use vinegar because it has some kind of an effect? also, is it necessary to simmer the peppers?

    BTW, Hi from Israel 🙂

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Adir, you can simmer with the brine if you’d like, though vinegar will assist in preservation but also flavor, more like Tabasco sauce, which uses a lot of vinegar. No, simmering isn’t necessary, though it does help to develop and blend flavor. I hope this helps.

  2. 5 stars
    Trying the fermented version and some of the pepper remnants float to the top and start to mold after 1 day. Guess I need to forget this batch and start over? Was a bit surprised the mold started so quickly and understand now to keep them under the water at all times – but having difficulty since they rise to the top.

    And a warning when boiling the peppers and processing them. Might want to use a mask of some sort and eye protection cause that stuff is HOT and you will be coughing for a while if you breathe in the fumes. Good flavor but this has to be the hottest sauce I have ever had. Be warned 🙂

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Thanks for the input, Dan. Yes, very important to keep the batch below the brine. You can scrape off that early top layer usually as long as there is no rot or overall bad smell. Use a baggie filled with water to help keep the mash down. Good tip about the fumes. They can get ya!

  3. Hi. Thanks very much for this recipe. I want to add lemon to my hot sauce – would you suggest swapping out some of the vinegar for lemon juice or adding some zest in? And at what stage of the process. Thanks very much!

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Hi, Alice. Yes, you can swap that in. I would add it, taste, and then adjust with vinegar to your preference (if desired). Once all added, I would simmer a bit to meld. Let me know how it goes. Enjoy!

  4. 5 stars
    Michael,
    Very nice article, very informative!
    I have three questions I’d like to know what you think about:
    1. Have you tried the non-fermented version with zero added salt?
    2. What do think of making the non-fermented version with only red crushed peppers (same weight as you suggest for tabasco peppers) and vinegar?
    3. What about with just cayenne powder and vinegar? What cayenne weight would use for the same amount of vinegar you recommend?
    Thank you!
    F

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Thanks, Fleischman. To answer — 1. You can skip the salt. I would use a salt alternative for flavor. 2. You can ferment dried peppers. You may need a fermentation starter. Dried is typically 1/4 the weight of fresh. 3. Yes, doable. 1 pound of fresh chili peppers will yield about 4 ounces dried pods. Ground down, it should yield 3/4 cup chili powder. You should be able to convert from there.

      Use the following pages as references:

      How to Make Hot Sauce from Dried Peppers: https://www.chilipeppermadness.com/recipes/how-to-make-hot-sauce-from-dried-peppers/

      How to Make Hot Sauce from Powders: https://www.chilipeppermadness.com/recipes/how-to-make-hot-sauce-from-chili-powders

  5. Hi Michael, I made your unfermented recipe, oh my goodness it is delicious, but much hotter than Tabasco brand. I used my homegrown Tabasco peppers , any suggestions on how to tone it down?
    And when you dehydrate the the seeds and pulp do you then remove the seeds?
    Your suggestions are greatly appreciated .

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Thanks, Stephanie. The best way to tone this down is to dilute it with other mild ingredients, like combining it with another sauce made from mild peppers, or adding ingredients like tomato. Or, just use it very sparingly. For dehydrating, I usually do not remove the seeds, but you can let them shake out. It’s hard to get them all with the pulp. They can add a bitter flavor sometimes, so keep that in mind.

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Janice, it is a bit more than 1/4 cup. Yes, you can skip the straining. Enjoy.

  6. I’ll be trying this with home-grown red serrano peppers.

    Tom, if you’re interested in pineapple, I bet pineapple vinegar would be an interesting tweak to the recipe. I’ve made my own pineapple vinegar, before, to make encurtido and it was delicious.

  7. 5 stars
    Can you recommend a hot sauce bottle that comes with shaker or dripper top you can apply? When I use Tabasco I can always shake just the right amount of heat to the recipe. With the bottles I am using it gets sort of clumsy and I can easily add too much. Thanks.

  8. 5 stars
    In the fermented recipe, what is the purpose of burping the jar? It would seem to me that letting oxygen in the jar would increase the possibility of spoilage. I’m at 5 days without burping (the jar that is!) – hopefully I didn’t mess this up and have to start over. So your insight will be helpful. Thanks.

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Joe, as fermentation occurs, gases are released, which can build up pressure inside the sealed jar. If you do not burp it, it could potentially explode. This happens to people and their hot sauce bottles quite often. You are correct about exposing the batch during burping, which is why I recommend using some sort of an airlock filter or a membrane. I use a membrane from Masontop Lids that work great for me. Here is a link to Buy Masontop Lids at Amazon (it’s an affiliate link, FYI): https://amzn.to/2wDZPP8

  9. whats the best way to preserve or store the sauce once done? Im doing the non fermented version. Also how long is it good for before going bad?

    Thanks

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Matt, this will last quite a long time, but you can process it through a water bath for much longer term storage, or use a pressure canner.

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Angela, just use green tabasco peppers. Or, you can use other green peppers, like the jalapeno or serrano. Let me know how it goes for you.

  10. 5 stars
    Hi Mike,

    I was wondering if you could share the details of the Hot Water Bath process. Temps, durations etc.
    I have some chilli plants (type unknown as my son started them off at school) and am hoping to make my first batch of fermented sauce using the boil / simmer process. I would like to Hot Bath the bottles to increase the shelf life further.
    Or is the Hot Bath process not required if I boil / simmer at the end?

    I have bought Chocolate Habanero seeds and Tabasco seeds for next year’s crop.

    Many thanks Ady.

    P.S. Great site bTw

  11. Allison Buder

    5 stars
    This was so easy to follow and did not disappoint. Thank you for sharing your recipe and responses to all the comments.
    This has such a nice spice.

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Jordan, this is debated widely in the hot sauce community. The acidity acts as a strong preservative, so many people leave it out. However, anything can go bad eventually, so some like to refrigerate. I prefer to refrigerate.

  12. Michael Houston

    5 stars
    Hey Mike!
    Man.. I ended up after 3 days in the brine to finish withe the unfermented method, but dumping the brine in with the peppers. I was sure I had messed up a whole lb. of peppers… I used rice wine vinegar for 1 batch & white wine vinegar for the other batch. The rice wine batch is my favorite… sweet, hot & spicy. I’ve never tasted anything like it before. So [email protected] good! Thanks so much for sharing your recipes.

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Awesome. Thanks, Michael. Super happy how it turned out for you, sir.

  13. Mike,

    What’s the best way to dilute this? Love the flavor but it’s way too hot for me (non fermented).

    Thanks,

    Kortney

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Kortney, the best way is to bring in other ingredients. You can try making the exact same recipe with sweet (no heat) peppers, then combine them, or try it out with something like carrots or even garlic, or a combination, then combine them. I hope this helps.

  14. 5 stars
    Hi Michael! I planted 10 tobasco pepper bushes this year. I harvested a lb. Of peppers last night and went with the fermented method. Question: I pureed the peppers in my food processor and now the pepper mash I’d floating to the top. Are they going to spoil? Should I just go ahead with the unfermented method instead?

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Hey, Michael! You’ll need to keep the peppers beneath the brine, or they do run the risk of spoiling. Try using a baggie with some water in it. Stuff it down into the jar and seal it. This can help keep everything submerged. If you are concerned, you can try the non-fermented method. Let me know how it goes. Take care.

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Yes, Carla. There is plenty of vinegar in the recipe.

  15. Curt Swindoll

    This is good stuff. Not for the faint of heart. Lit. Me. Up. Scalp and eye sockets are sweating. And I eat hot sauces all the time.

    A couple of things: we used about a cup (which I think is about five ounces) of tobasco chilis and added 8-10 cayenne peppers. All harvested this morning. We substituted the cup of white wine vinegar for 3/4 cup white vinegar and 1/4 cup of distilled water and a tablespoon of sugar. Simmered for 15 minutes (covered) to not lose too much of the vinegar/water. Blended it on “purée” since my food processor isn’t strong enough to blend it up. When filtering the mash you have to really pressed down on the sieve to get all the saucy goodness out. Added another half teaspoon of salt. It’s definitely redder than regular tobasco. And MUCH hotter. Might add a little more sugar. I’m guessing it is brighter red than store bought sauce because the chilis weren’t aged at all. All were orange and red. But it’s good.

  16. 5 stars
    Does it matter if dried tabascos are used? I’m just starting to harvest them now, but some will be dry before I get enough to try the recipe. Thanks.

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Amy, I like to use white vinegar, though any will do, really. Just make sure you enjoy the flavor, as this is a vinegar heavy recipe.

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Tom, I personally would add it at the end, when you puree everything. Just add some into the puree. You can strain out solids, if desired.

  17. 5 stars
    The flavor is great. I just made this from my Tobasco peppers I grew in the garden. Awesome recipe. Quick question though. I followed the recipe to the T and I didn’t quite fill up one 5 oz hot sauce bottle. I’m wondering how you were able to fill up 2 with this recipe? Don’t get me wrong it is great. Just curious on how to get more bang for the buck in terms of effort. Thanks for great recipe!

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Chris, not sure if there was an issue, but it’s ok if the jar isn’t filled. You can use more peppers as well. Glad you enjoyed it!

  18. Darrell Fluman

    You would think someone that presents themselves and their website as EXPERTS would take the time to do some research. TABASCO sauce IS NOT fermented. It is aged. The vinegar is in the mash, preventing fermentation. Fermentation is a process using bacteria, yeast or molds to transform the raw material. into something unique. A simple e-mail to McHilleny Company will confirm this. Do your own homework before posting.

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Dear Mr. Fluman, this is a direct quote from the Tabasco.com web site at https://www.tabasco.com/blog/about-our-barrels/:

      “How are the barrels used in the production process? After red peppers reach the perfect shade of deep red, they are carefully handpicked, mashed, and mixed with a small amount of salt on the same day. This pepper mash is then transported to Avery Island, La. where it’s put into white oak barrels in the barrel warehouse. The barrel tops are then sealed with salt to form a natural protective barrier that also allows for the release of gases produced during the slow fermentation process. Pepper mash is aged in these barrels for up to three years before it’s blended with high-quality distilled vinegar for 28 days, strained, and bottled.”

      Please note the use of the phrase “fermentation process”. While I appreciate comments, your tone is quite rude and flatly off the mark, good sir. Best to you.

  19. I have an abundance of hot peppers this year. I was wondering if youve ever tried to can this recipe?

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Beth, I have not personally, but it is quite high in acidity. You can easily process the bottles or jars with a hot water bath for long term storage.

  20. 5 stars
    So easy, my tabascos grew next to a habenero so it is pretty spicy. Love the heat. Time for ghost pepper sauce next.

  21. 5 stars
    Received a pepper plant for a gift a month ago….harvested all the peppers (5oz exactly!) and fermented for 2 weeks following your recipe. This turned out spectacular. I couldn’t be happier!

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Try it with about 50 of them, Justin, though a scale is the best for this recipe for accuracy.

  22. I was confused with the directions. Firstly, what size jar? And do you use the entire quart of brine or just fill it enough just to cover the peppers?

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Stephanie, use a quart jar, and you only need enough brine to cover the peppers. Let me know how it goes for you.

  23. If I decided to keep the bottles at room temperature, how long would the shelf life be?

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Katie, there is a lot of vinegar in this, so it really should last many months, even outside of the refrigerator. Just keep an eye on it. If you see any growths, etc, toss it. The acidic environment is a good preservative.

  24. Hi.
    Nice recipe.
    If I would like to add a touch of coriander.
    Should I fermented with the peppers or I should add it later on

    Thanks

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      John, you can add the coriander later on if you’d like. Let me know how it goes. Enjoy!

  25. Boiling will kill any of the good bacterial gained from lacto fermentation

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Yes, it also stops the fermentation process. You don’t have to boil it if you don’t want to.

  26. 5 stars
    Is this 5 ounces chopped in a measuring cup or a weight of 5 ounces?

  27. I’m going to be making this hot sauce in a couple of weeks I just wanted to know if you have some recommendations on a high quality white wine vinegar to use in this recipe? Thank you

    1. Sorry for some reason the post wasn’t showing on mine so I didn’t think it went through thank you for the response and sorry for the second post

  28. I’m going to make this soon and would like to know what’s a good white wine vinegar to use? Thanks

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Kevin, there are many different types of good white vinegar. You don’t have to go too expensive, just get one you like the flavor of. I often go with a mid range simple white wine vinegar from the grocery store. Just don’t use the cheap stuff unless you enjoy the flavor.

  29. 5 stars
    Finished making this today after 2 weeks of fermentation. Came out fantastic, nice and hot. Used mainly Tabasco peppers however add about 1/3 volume was using Thai peppers for extra heat.

    Have another brew going using Jalapeños and plan to add kiwi fruit for sweetness (goes brilliant with eggs).

    1. Question on shelf life, does this sauce need to be refrigerated? How long should it last in or out of the fridge?

      1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

        I refrigerate my hot sauces, though many people do not. The pH should be pretty low with this one, so many people feel that is enough to keep it from spoiling. I prefer refrigeration for the extra caution.

        1. Thanks, given I am not talking about a huge quantity, may as well keep in the fridge. Was thinking of sending a bottle to sister in law in the US which is really the reason for the question give it will take a week or two to get to her…..

          Cheers
          Greg

          1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

            Sure thing!!

    2. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Excellent! Love to hear it. I really love this hot sauce, and it’s so easy to customize with other peppers. Nicely done.

  30. Doni henry

    If making more then the 5oz peppers per batch at once. Would you do 3 tbs salt for every 5oz? I have a half gallon jar full approx 35 oz of peppers. Does that mean I need 21 tbs of salt in the jar to ferment. Thanks Doni

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Doni, if you are making the NON-Fermented version, use only 1/4 teaspoon per 5 ounces, but you can adjust down from there. You probably won’t need as much salt, but go to your own tastes. For a FERMENTED version, use 3 tablespoons of seal serve per quart of water for the brine. Just make sure you have enough brine to cover the peppers. If you need more brine, make another quart and use that. Let me know if this helps.

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      JR, it would be harder with most red pepper flakes brands, though it was work. You’ll need a lot of the flakes and a good strainer, and I don’t believe it will be as strong/concentrated. Whole dried peppers are much better, but if you try it, let me know how it turns out for you.

  31. Kort Kramer

    5 stars
    Question, have you tried mixing the fermented and not fermented version in equal parts? I think you’ll get the best of both worlds. 🙂

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Hi, Kort! I have NOT tried that, actually! Now I’m curious!

  32. Dave gingerich

    5 stars
    Went with Thai/Hab’s peppers-1cup water 1 cup white wine vinegar-great flavors-as added onion/garlic —-what do u think fridge life is bottled—-I’m not at ph lever tester!

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Sounds great, Dave. This will easily last many months or longer in the fridge. I’m sure the pH is low enough with 1 cup of vinegar.

  33. 5 stars
    I still had tabasco peppers frozen in the freezer so decided to make the non-fermented version. Surprised by how much I like it. I honestly think I prefer this over the original. This one does have more of a bite, as you said. Hard to choose, though. I love them both. Thanks for another great recipe.

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      Thanks, Damien. I’m the same way. I LOVE original Tabasco brand hot sauce and buy it all the time, but there is something to be said for making your own. I love it all!

  34. 4 stars
    Sometimes things are better when you buy it, and once in a while I can make it better than what you can buy. I can’t match 3 yrs. in oak.

    1. Michael Hultquist - Chili Pepper Madness

      5 stars
      I wouldn’t say better at all, but this version is certainly a bit different. Definitely can’t match 3 years aging in oak barrels, but then again, I can’t get a fresh non-fermented version anywhere else, and certainly not from tabasco peppers grown in my own garden.

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